Loading...
Internet

How to Find a Computer Router

So, you want to know how to find a computer router, eh? First things first: are you a newbie to the whole router networking arena or have you gone ahead and bought that one at the Wal-Mart and now you’re looking to locate a computer router that has some real meat and muscle to it? No, wait, that’s not exactly first things first when it comes to how to find a computer router.

First things parts, part II: A router is a piece of computer equipment that makes connecting multiple computers to a network possible and comes with easy arris nvg468mq manual. Routers come in both wired and wireless models, but most places that sell routers will offer each kind for sale. Finding a computer router is probably easier than determining what kind of router you need, so do your homework before actually buying one.

When embarking upon your odyssey to track down the perfect computer router the very first place you may want to begin is at your computer. Conduct an internet search using your favorite search engine…and then use Yahoo if that fails. (I kid Yahoo, but, you know, c’mon, they’re Yahoo!) You will find much broader access to a line of top-notch routers by perusing online computer equipment stores than you will conveniently find even in a big city like New York or Los Angeles or Wasilla. The downside to finding a router on the internet is that you may not get as good a warranty and there may be no customer service rep capable of answering your questions. For this reason, try to find a reputable router dealer with a FAQ and, even better, an online customer service rep who seems knowledgeable.

While on the internet in your search for the value router, hop on over to eBay for computer router deals that will blow your mind. The upside to buying a router on eBay is that you can often get a deal that will save you more than half the money you would spend at a brick and mortar or online store. The downside is that you have no way of knowing whether the router will actually work, so always make sure the seller has a no questions asked return policy. And pay attention to the seller’s rating and how much they have sold. If an eBay seller has a rating of over 95% and has sold over 500 items, you can usually trust him.

If what you don’t trust is handing out your credit card number to an online dealer, or you simply don’t trust those who sell on eBay, get in your vehicle and put money in the hands of billionaires by using gas to drive to a local store. Big-name stores like Wal-Mart, Sam’s Club, Target, and Best Buy sell a limited number of brands of routers. The convenience of being able to buy a router within thirty minutes of deciding you absolutely must have one is tempered by the fact that you may not necessarily be getting the best router available. Customer service at big chain stores is notoriously sketchy when it comes to technology, so don’t necessarily believe everything you are told about how wonderful the expensive router is and how awful the much cheaper router is. (Though my own experience at both Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club when buying technology has been, for the most part, more reliable than any help I have ever received at Best Buy or the late Circuit City.)

The best thing to do is go to the store with a pen and pad and write down the name and model number of any router you are interested in and then come home and get back on the computer and do the research with reputable reviewers like the surprisingly dependable folks at CNET.com. Seriously, people, if you are basing your technology buying decisions on forums and capsule reviews left by users, you are making a huge mistake. You have no way of knowing if those people are idiots, pranksters, or viral marketing shills paid to go around talking up products they have never even actually seen in action. One last word about finding a router at a brick and mortar: don’t forget about the locally owned and operated computer stores which may actually have a better selection of routers than the big boys even if they can’t afford to sell them as cheaply.

If the value is first and foremost to you in your effort to find a computer router, you may find a good bargain by shopping at outlet stores, closeout stores, flea markets, and yard sales. There is a closeout store near Loxley, AL that used to sell routers, shrink-wrapped in their original packing, for less than $25. There is a flea market in my hometown where several booths are given over to nothing but computer items. A yard sale may be a trickier method of finding a router you can trust, but the price may well be low enough to urge you to take a chance. It is not unknown for people to buy a router and never use it, so it eventually winds up at a yard sale. As long as you can return the router if it doesn’t work, there is nothing wrong with a used router or one being sold as seconds, but don’t expect much in the way of refund if you go the flea market or yard sale route.

Featured
How to Silence Homebrew Trail Cameras
Things to Do in Northwest Ohio